Choice Women Empowerment
  
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Helping Women Find Their Voice

Identifying  Domestic Violence​​

According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, or NCADV, domestic violence is defined as the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive behavior as part of a systematic pattern of power & control perpetrated by one intimate partner against another. It includes physical violence, sexual violence, psychological violence, and emotional abuse. The frequency and severity of domestic violence can vary dramatically; however, the one constant component of domestic violence is one partner’s consistent efforts to maintain power and control over the other.
  
Common Domestic abuse scenario in an immigrant family: “Imagine being beaten by your husband or threatened with deportation & having your children removed from you. Perhaps police show up in response to a call or complaint but you can’t speak their language. How would you deal with family members angry with you for bringing shame to your family or to your community?” For many women these are all too common scenarios. Their options & resources are minimal because of cultural & language barriers. It is hard for the women & children of minority community to come forward & report it thinking “WHAT WILL PEOPLE SAY?”  

There are various reasons why Domestic Violence is underreported in communities:

  1.  Due to language barrier                                                                                                                                      
  2.  There is a guilt of bringing shame to the family                                                                                                 
  3.  For many women, their identity/existence is wrapped up in relationship to their families. ​I am  someone’s wife, I am someone’s mother.                                                                                                            
  4.  Another big cause of Domestic violence is the link between violence & love in families. Many  immigrants  grew up in a society where domestic corporal punishment was acceptable and legal.  As  a result, children  grow up equating beating with love.

There is still much work to be done within the our communities to help women & children of domestic violence. There is usually resistance from the abuser to accept accountability for their own actions because for many, beating is considered acceptable behavior.”
  

National Statistics On Domestic Violence

On average, 24 people per minute are victims of rape, physical violence or stalking by an intimate partner in the United States — more than 12 million women and men over the course of a year.

Nearly 3 in 10 women (29%) and 1 in 10 men (10%) in the US have experienced rape, physical violence and/or stalking by a partner and report a related impact on their functioning.

Nearly, 15% of women (14.8%) and 4% of men have been injured as a result of IPV that included rape, physical violence and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime.

1 in 4 women (24.3%) and 1 in 7 men (13.8%) aged 18 and older in the United States have been the victim of severe physical violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime.

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) alone affects more than 12 million per year.

More than 1 in 3 women (35.6%) and more than 1 in 4 men (28.5%) in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime.

Nearly half of all women and men in the United States have experienced psychological aggression by an intimate partner in their lifetime (48.4% and 48.8%, respectively).

 Females ages 18 to 24 and 25 to 34 generally experienced the highest rates of intimate partner violence.

From 1994 to 2010, about 4 in 5 victims of intimate partner violence were female.

Most female victims of intimate partner violence were previously victimized by the same offender, including 77% of females ages 18 to 24, 76% of females ages 25 to 34, and 81% of females ages 35 to 49.
 
[i-x]      http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/ipv_factsheet2012-a.pdf